The Mexican National Unit Vocabulary

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Description

Overview

After this introduction to the unit vocabulary, students will know how to use social studies terminology correctly, including cash crop; Centralism; Federalism; empresario; nationalism; and The Old 300. Vocabulary includes terms, key people, and events of the Texas Revolution.

Vocabulary Terms

Anglo-American
a white, English-speaking American
cash crop
a crop produced for a profit rather than for a growers use
Centralism
the control of states in which the power is held under a centralized authority rather than in the power of the states
Constitution
a document explaining the fundamental principles or established precedents by which a government is to be governed
empresario
person who arranged for the settlement of land in Texas
Federalism
a type of government in which the power is divided between the national government and other governmental units
filibuster
an adventurer who engages in unauthorized military expeditions into foreign countries
immigrate
to move into a foreign country as a permanent resident
nationalism
: loyalty to one’s nation with the belief that the nation should have sovereignty over their homeland and have a national identity with a shared culture, language, religion, and politics
Tejano/Tejana
a person of Mexican heritage who lives in Texas as his or her home
The Old 300
The original 300 families granted permission to settle in Stephen F Austin’s colony

Key People

Moses Austin
(October 4, 1761 – June 10, 1821): Founder of the American lead industry. Proposed settlement of 300 Anglo families in Texas to the Spanish government. His dying request was for his son, Stephen F. Austin, to move forward with his plans for the Austin Colony in Texas
Stephen F. Austin
(November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836): settled the Old Three Hundred families in the Austin Colony. Imprisoned in Mexico 1834-35. Supported organized opposition to Mexico. First Secretary of State of the Republic of Texas
Erasmo Seguín
(1782-1857): a Tejano who helped Moses Austin obtain approval from Spanish officials to settle American colonists in Texas. Texas representative to the congress that wrote the Constitution of 1824, where he worked on the National Colonization Law of 1825
Juan Seguín
(October 27, 1806 – August 27, 1890): son of Erasmo Seguin, he supported Texas’ right to influence Mexican law, and commanded a unit at the Battle of San Jacinto
Martin De Leon
(1765–1833): a Mexican empresario who settled 200 families in South Texas, he founded the town of Victoria in 1824 and was a very successful rancher
Green DeWitt
(1787-1835): a major empresario who was granted permission to settle 400 Anglo-Americans next to Austin’s colony
José Antonio Navarro
(February 27, 1795 - January 13, 1871): a leading Tejano participant in the Texas Revolution, one of the three Mexican signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence and one of just two native-born Tejano singers
Manuel de Mier y Terán
(February 18, 1789 – July 3, 1832): toured Texas with a military escort to make recommendations about the future of Texas. Recommended measures be taken to stop the United States from acquiring Texas. His suggestions were used to help create the Law of April 6, 1830

Major Events

Mexican Federal Constitution of 1824
stated the official religion was Catholicism banning all other religions and giving states the right to elect their own representatives. Slavery wasn’t included in the constitution
State Colonization Laws of 1825
laws that allowed colonization of Mexico by Anglo-Americans and defined privileges and limitations of those settlers. The law defined the amount of land and uses, no tax due for 10 years, citizenship after 3 years, and children of slaves freed at the age of 14 years
Fredonian Rebellion
near Nacogdoches in 1826, the Fredonian Republic claimed that Texas was no longer under Mexican control, Benjamin Edwards led a small group into Nacogdoches, claiming this city as the capital of Fredonia; Fredonians gave up when they heard of Mexican troops coming in 1827
Mier y Terán Report
report written by a Mexican official named Manuel de Mier y Terán; convinced Mexico they needed better control of Texas
Law of April 6th, 1830
wrote the Texas Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, organized the ad-interim government, and named Sam Houston commander in chief of the military forces of the Republic

Teacher Tools

Description

Overview

Lack of understanding of basic vocabulary is one of the most common obstacles to understanding new content that we see in the classroom. This applies for all students but is especially important for students with various learning needs. This activity is meant to be an introduction activity to the vocabulary words students will see throughout the Mexican National Unit. When students have an opportunity to make their own connections there is a higher chance that they will remember the meaning of the word.

Accommodated Vocabulary Terms

Anglo-American
a white, English-speaking American
cash crop
a crop produced for a profit rather than for a growers use
Centralism
the control of states in which the power is held under a centralized authority rather than in the power of the states
Constitution
a document explaining the fundamental principles or established precedents by which a government is to be governed
empresario
person who arranged for the settlement of land in Texas
Federalism
a type of government in which the power is divided between the national government and other governmental units
filibuster
an adventurer who engages in unauthorized military expeditions into foreign countries
immigrate
to move into a foreign country as a permanent resident
nationalism
loyalty to one’s nation with the belief that the nation should have sovereignty over their homeland and have a national identity with a shared culture, language, religion, and politics
Tejano/Tejana
a person of Mexican heritage who lives in Texas as his or her home
The Old 300
The original 300 families granted permission to settle in Stephen F Austin’s colony

Key People

Moses Austin
(October 4, 1761 – June 10, 1821): proposed settlement of 300 Anglo families in Texas to the Spanish government. His dying request was for his son, Stephen F. Austin, to move forward with his plans for the Austin Colony in Texas
Stephen F. Austin
(November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836): settled the Old Three Hundred families in the Austin Colony. Imprisoned in Mexico 1834-35. Supported organized opposition to Mexico. First Secretary of State of the Republic of Texas
Erasmo Seguín
(1782-1857): a Tejano who helped Moses Austin obtain approval from Spanish officials to settle American colonists in Texas. Texas representative to the congress that wrote the Constitution of 1824, where he worked on the National Colonization Law of 1825
Juan Seguín
(October 27, 1806 – August 27, 1890): son of Erasmo Seguin, he supported Texas’ right to influence Mexican law, and commanded a unit at the Battle of San Jacinto
Martin De Leon
(1765–1833): a Mexican empresario who settled 200 families in South Texas, he founded the town of Victoria in 1824 and was a very successful rancher
Green DeWitt
(1787-1835): a major empresario who was granted permission to settle 400 Anglo-Americans next to Austin’s colony
José Antonio Navarro
(February 27, 1795 - January 13, 1871): a leading Tejano participant in the Texas Revolution, one of the three Mexican signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence and one of just two native-born Tejano signers
Manuel de Mier y Terán
(February 18, 1789 – July 3, 1832): toured Texas with a military escort to make recommendations about the future of Texas. Recommended measures be taken to stop the United States from acquiring Texas. His suggestions were used to help create the Law of April 6, 1830

Major Events

Mexican Federal Constitution of 1824
stated the official religion was Catholicism banning all other religions and giving states the right to elect their own representatives. Slavery wasn’t included in the constitution
State Colonization Laws of 1825
laws that allowed colonization of Mexico by Anglo-Americans and defined privileges and limitations of those settlers. The law defined the amount of land and uses, no tax due for 10 years, citizenship after 3 years, and children of slaves freed at the age of 14 years
Fredonian Rebellion
near Nacogdoches in 1826, the Fredonian Republic claimed that Texas was no longer under Mexican control, Benjamin Edwards led a small group into Nacogdoches, claiming this city as the capital of Fredonia; Fredonians gave up when they heard of Mexican troops coming in 1827
Mier y Terán Report
report written by a Mexican official named Manuel de Mier y Terán; convinced Mexico they needed better control of Texas
Law of April 6th, 1830
after Mier y Terán wrote his report that Anglo Texans could not be trusted, this law closed the frontier of Texas to any further Anglo-American settlement

Teacher Tools

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Updates

The page was updated on 05/13/2022.

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