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Pacing

This unit is a three-week study of the events of the Texas Revolution. Suggested pacing minutes are based on the average time it takes a class to complete each lesson; however, as the educator, use your best judgment based on the average pace of your class learning styles.

Contents

Era Overview

Conflicts during the Revolution Period brought tremendous chaos and upheaval to nearly everyone within Texas.

Public opinion throughout Texas during the Revolution was deeply divided. Some Anglo-American settlers feared the destruction that a war could bring to the region, while others (often newer arrivals) sought to break the region from Mexico. Most Tejanos saw the conflict as part of a larger civil war within Mexico that pitted Santa Anna’s centralists against the federalists who wanted to restore the Constitution of 1824. For some enslaved African Americans, the war offered a chance to gain their freedom by running to the lines of the Mexican Army. Women in Texas often had to fend for themselves and their children when men left to fight on the frontlines.

When fighting broke out in October 1835, most Texans could not yet agree on whether they were fighting to restore the Constitution of 1824 or for independence. When Santa Anna marched his army into Texas in February 1836 and laid siege to the Alamo, a delegation of Texans responded by declaring independence on March 2, 1836. The war itself brought widespread destruction to the region, with the fall of the Alamo, the massacre at Goliad, the panic of the Runaway Scrape, and the burning of towns and homes by both armies. When Sam Houston’s ragtag army won an improbable victory at San Jacinto on April 21, 1836, the results of the Texas Revolution reverberated across all of North America.

Unit Level Downloads (English)

  • Unit Plan Unit Plan MS Word Unit Plan Adobe PDF

    Downloadable/Editable versions of the English language unit plan. Provides an Era Overview and pacing, and outlines each lesson’s estimated completion time, essential questions, a description of each lesson, and student learning experiences and activities.

Lessons

We've assembled the following list of lessons that are applicable to this unit. Most lessons contain downloadable and printable documents, activities, and other resources to aid in classroom instruction.

The Texas Revolution Unit Vocabulary

Students will know how to use social studies terminology correctly. Vocabulary includes terms, key people, and events of the Texas Revolution.

Vocabulary List Downloadable/Editable versions of the terms that appear on this page. Lista de vocabulario Ersiones descargables / editables de los términos que aparecen en este página. Vocabulary Discovery Students will use the Vocabulary Discovery to complete either the Vocabulary Graphic Organizer or the Vocabular Graphic Organizer Modified. Images and Definitions provided in the Vocabulary Discovery slideshow. Vocabulary Graphic Organizer Students will use the Vocabulary Graphic Organizer to write out the vocabulary word, provide a definition, draw an image or picture, and provide use examples as well as a non-example. Vocabulary Graphic Organizer Modified Students will use the Vocabulary Graphic Organizer Modified to write out the vocabulary word, provide a definition, and draw an image or picture.
Unit Plan # 1 60 min English | Español | Accommodations none 722A 73B

Texas Revolution: The Big Picture

Students will understand how individuals, events, and issues related to the Texas Revolution shaped the history of Texas, through analysis of letters, journals, and personal accounts from the Alamo.

Lesson Plan Downloadable/editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise In this printable hook exercise, students will write a letter to a family member requesting help achieving a goal outlined in the scenario. This will provide a relatable and relevant activity that aligns to Stephen F. Austin’s letter to his sister. Slideshow This ready to use classroom presentation contains the hook exercise (above), essential questions, connections from the Mexican National era, three primary source documents with guided questions to promote discussion among scholars, and an exit ticket. The Constitution of 1824 vs. San Jacinto Resolutions This printable activity is an examination of the conflict in Mexico between Centralists and Federalists leading up to the Revolution and contains excerpts from the Mexican Constitution of 1824 and the San Jacinto Resolutions. Students will analyze excerpts from both documents. Taking up Arms This printable activity contains the full version of the “Texas Declaration of Causes for Taking Up Arms Against Santa Anna.” Students will analyze the claims against Mexico and form opinions based on the primary sources and the document analysis questions. Letter from Stephen F. Austin to Mary Austin Holley Stephen F. Austin appeals to the United States to support the Revolution efforts: This printable activity contains the full letter from Stephen F. Austin to Mary Austin Holley, dated January 7, 1836. Students will analyze the conditions of the Texian volunteers and form an opinion about the outcome of the Revolution. Exit Ticket This printable exit ticket uses an opinion-based question to gauge understanding of the Texian army readiness before the Revolution. Lesson Plan Versiones descargables / editables de esta página. Ejercicio de gancho En este ejercicio de gancho imprimible, los estudiantes escribirán una carta a un miembro de la familia solicitando ayuda para lograr una meta descrita en el escenario. Esto proporcionará una actividad relacionada y relevante que se alinea con la carta de Stephen F. Austin a su hermana. Presentación de diapositivas presentación Esta presentación en el aula lista para usar contiene el ejercicio de gancho, esencial preguntas, conexiones desde el Nacional Mexicano era, tres documentos de fuente primaria con guía preguntas para promover la discusión entre los académicos, y un boleto de salida. La Constitución de 1824 vs. las Resoluciones de San Jacinto Esta actividad imprimible es un examen del conflicto en México entre Centralistas y Federalistas que condujo a la Revolución y contiene extractos de la Constitución Mexicana de 1824 y las Resoluciones de San Jacinto. Los estudiantes analizarán extractos de ambos documentos. Tomando las armas Esta actividad imprimible contiene la versión completa de la “Declaración de causas de Texas para tomar las armas contra Santa Anna”. Los estudiantes analizarán los reclamos contra México y formarán opiniones basadas en las fuentes primarias y las preguntas de análisis de documentos. Una carta a su hermana Stephen F. Austin apela a los Estados Unidos para que apoyen los esfuerzos de la Revolución: Esta actividad imprimible contiene la carta completa de Stephen F. Austin a Mary Austin Holley, fechada el 7 de enero de 1836. Los estudiantes analizarán las condiciones de los voluntarios de Texas y formarán una opinión sobre el resultado de la revolución. Boleto de salida Este boleto de salida imprimible utiliza una pregunta basada en la opinión para medir la comprensión de la preparación del ejército de Texas antes de la Revolución. Lesson Plan Downloadable/editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise In this printable hook exercise, students will write a letter to a family member requesting help achieving a goal outlined in the scenario. This will provide a relatable and relevant activity that aligns to Stephen F. Austin’s letter to his sister. Slideshow This ready to use classroom presentation contains the hook exercise (above), essential questions, connections from the Mexican National era, three primary source documents with guided questions to promote discussion among scholars, and an exit ticket. The Constitution of 1824 vs. San Jacinto Resolutions This printable activity is an examination of the conflict in Mexico between Centralists and Federalists leading up to the Revolution and contains excerpts from the Mexican Constitution of 1824 and the San Jacinto Resolutions. Students will analyze excerpts from both documents. Taking up Arms This printable activity contains the full version of the “Texas Declaration of Causes for Taking Up Arms Against Santa Anna.” Students will analyze the claims against Mexico and form opinions based on the primary sources and the document analysis questions. Letter from Stephen F. Austin to Mary Austin Holley Stephen F. Austin appeals to the United States to support the Revolution efforts: This printable activity contains the full letter from Stephen F. Austin to Mary Austin Holley, dated January 7, 1836. Students will analyze the conditions of the Texian volunteers and form an opinion about the outcome of the Revolution. Exit Ticket This printable exit ticket uses an opinion-based question to gauge understanding of the Texian army readiness before the Revolution.
Unit Plan # 2 90 min English | Espanol | Accommodations none 73A 73C 76A 716A 720B 720C 720D 76AELA 76CELA 815SS 817SS

The Road to the Texas Revolution

Examines the causes leading up to the revolution, providing a comprehensive overview of major contributing events.

Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise This printable hook exercise focuses on an excerpt of two primary source documents (Austin letter to Fredonia Rebels and the Announcement of the Law of April 6, 1830) that are used as additional interactive materials inside of the PowerPoint presentation. Suggested printing: 1 per student Slideshow This, ready-to-use, classroom presentation contains essential questions, a timeline of events beginning with The Mexican Constitution of 1824 through 1835 Siege of San Antonio de Bexar, and two primary source documents with guided questions to promote discussion among scholars (see lecture notes within the slides for specific details). Guided Notes These printable guided notes were specifically designed to be used in conjunction with the presentation. Students will use the guided notes to create a timeline of events that lead to the Texas Revolution and interact with the primary source documents. Suggested printing: 1 per student Austin Letter To The Fredonia Rebels This printable primary source document should be used in conjunction with the FIRST “Think-Pair-Share” activity. Suggested printing: 1 per group Articles Of The Law Of April 6, 1830 This printable primary source document should be used in conjunction with the SECOND “Think-Pair-Share” activity. Suggested printing: 1 per group Student Organizer - The Law of April 6, 1830 This printable worksheet should be used with the Articles Of The Law of April 6, 1830. Suggested printing: 1 per group Exit Ticket This printable exit ticket uses the three essential questions above to provide a formative assessment opportunity at the end of the lesson. Suggested printing: 1 ticket per student (two tickets per page) Mexican Constitution of 1824 Announcement of the Law of April 6 Comparing American and Texas Independence Lesson Plan Versiones descargables / editables de esta página. Ejercicio de gancho Este ejercicio de gancho imprimible se centra en un extracto de dos documentos de fuente primaria (carta de Austin a Fredonia Rebels y el anuncio de la ley del 6 de abril de 1830) que se utilizan como materiales interactivos adicionales dentro de la presentación de PowerPoint. Impresión sugerida: 1 por alumno. Presentación de diapositivas presentación Esta presentación en el aula, lista para usar, contiene preguntas esenciales, una línea de tiempo de los eventos que comienzan con la Constitución Mexicana de 1824 a 1835 Sitio de San Antonio de Bexar, y dos documentos de fuente primaria con preguntas guiadas para promover la discusión entre los académicos (vea las notas de la conferencia dentro de las diapositivas para detalles específicos). Notas guiadas Estas notas guiadas imprimibles fueron diseñadas específicamente para ser utilizadas en conjunto con la presentación. Los estudiantes utilizarán las notas guiadas para crear una línea de tiempo de los eventos que conducen a la Revolución de Texas e interactuar con los documentos de origen primario. Impresión sugerida: 1 por alumno. Carta de Austin a los Rebeldes de Fredonia Este documento de fuente primaria imprimible debe utilizarse junto con la actividad FIRST "Think-Pair-Share". Impresión sugerida: 1 por grupo. Artículos de la Ley de 6 de abril de 1830 Este documento de fuente primaria imprimible debe utilizarse junto con la segunda actividad "Think-Pair-Share". Impresión sugerida: 1 por grupo. Organizador estudiantil: La Ley de 6 de abril de 1830 Utilizando los apuntes guiados, analiza cada artículo desde la perspectiva de un ciudadano mexicano y de la de un colono angloamericano avecindado en Tejas. Ticket de salida Este boleto de salida imprimible utiliza las tres preguntas esenciales anteriores para proporcionar una oportunidad de evaluación formativa al final de la lección. Impresión sugerida: 1 entrada por estudiante (dos entradas por página) Constitución política mexicana de 1824 Anuncio de la Ley del 6 de abril Comparando la independencia de Estados Unidos y Texas Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this accommodated lesson plan. Hook Exercise This printable hook exercise focuses on an excerpt of two primary source documents (Austin letter to Fredonia Rebels and the Announcement of the Law of April 6, 1830) that are used as additional interactive materials inside of the PowerPoint presentation. Suggested printing: 1 per student Slideshow This classroom presentation contains essential questions, a timeline of events beginning with The Mexican Constitution of 1824 through the 1835 Siege of San Antonio de Bexar, and two primary source documents with guided questions to promote discussion among scholars (see lecture notes within the slides for specific details). Guided Notes These printable guided notes were specifically designed to be used in conjunction with the presentation. Students will use the guided notes to create a timeline of events that lead to the Texas Revolution and interact with the primary source documents. Suggested printing: 1 per student Austin Letter To The Fredonia Rebels This printable primary source document should be used in conjunction with the FIRST “Think-Pair-Share” activity. Suggested printing: 1 per group Articles Of The Law Of April 6, 1830 This printable primary source document should be used in conjunction with the SECOND “Think-Pair-Share” activity. Suggested printing: 1 per group Student Organizer - The Law of April 6, 1830 This printable worksheet should be used with the Articles Of The Law of April 6, 1830. Suggested printing: 1 per group Exit Ticket This printable exit ticket uses the three essential questions above to provide a formative assessment opportunity at the end of the lesson. Suggested printing: 1 ticket per student (two tickets per page) Mexican Constitution of 1824 Announcement of the Law of April 6
Unit Plan # 3 180 min English | Español | Accommodations none 73A 716A 720B 720C 720D 76ELA

The Road to the Texas Revolution - Extension Lesson

In this extension lesson for The Road to the Texas Revolution, students will complete a graphic organizer designed to provide a visual representation of the conflict between the Anglo-American and Tejanos vs. the Mexican Government.

Extension Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this lesson plan. Opposing Viewpoints T-Chart The purpose of this graphic organizer is to provide a visual representation of the conflict between the Anglo-American and Tejano’s vs. the Mexican Government. Mexican Constitution of 1824 A copy of the Mexican Constitution of 1824, hosted by Library of Congress.
Extension 45-60 min English none 73A 73C 716A 720B 720C 720D 76ELA

Voices: African Americans in the Texas Revolution

The student will explore African American experiences in the Texas Revolution through primary source documents focusing on Joe, Emily West, and others.

Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this lesson plan. The Expansion and Fight to Maintain Slavery in Texas Examination of the place of slavery in Texas leading up to the Revolution. This activity explores Anglo perspectives about the Texas Revolution and the institution of slavery. The Story of Joe An examination of the status of slavery during the revolution and what it meant for people like Joe, resulting in Joe running away in 1837. The Story of Emily West The story of Emily West’s journey from New York to Texas as a free African-American, serves as a window into that small community in Texas at the time of the Revolution. Lesson Plan Versiones descargables / editables de esta página. La expansión de la esclavitud y la lucha para mantenerla en Texas Un análisis del papel de la esclavitud en Texas en los años que condujeron a la Revolución. Esta actividad explora la perspectiva de los angloamericanos sobre la Revolución de Texas y la institución de la esclavitud. La historia de Joe Un análisis del estatus de la esclavitud durante la Revolución y cómo la experimentaba personas como Joe, resultando en su fuga en 1837. La historia de Emily West La historia del viaje de Emily West desde Nueva York a Texas como una afroamericana libre nos da una perspectiva sobre esa pequeña comunidad en Texas durante la época de la Revolución. Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this lesson plan. The Expansion and Fight to Maintain Slavery in Texas Examination of the place of slavery in Texas leading up to the Revolution. This activity explores Anglo perspectives about the Texas Revolution and the institution of slavery. The Story of Joe An examination of the status of slavery during the revolution and what it meant for people like Joe, resulting in Joe running away in 1837. The Story of Emily West The story of Emily West’s journey from New York to Texas as a free African-American, serves as a window into that small community in Texas at the time of the Revolution. Borden & Moore. Telegraph and Texas Register (Houston, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 18, Ed. 1, Friday, May 26, 1837, newspaper, May 26, 1837; Houston, Texas. Advertisement placed by John R. Jones, "Fifty Dollars," regarding Joe's disappearance. Laws of Texas Description of the laws regarding slavery in Texas from the Texas Slavery Project.
Unit Plan # 4 30-60 min English | Español | Accommodations untlbs people ethnic groups african americans 73A 73B 720A 720B 720C 722A

Voices: American Indians in the Texas Revolution

The student understands traditional historical points of reference to the Texas Revolution era and the impact American Indians had on shaping the development of Texas.

Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise An examination of Anglo-American relations with American Indians in Texas from the perspective of a 12-year-old girl leading up to the Texas Revolution. A Tejano Living among the Comanches This activity explores a historical account of a young Tejano boy, Macario Leal, who was capture by a Comanche raiding party and lived with the Comanche for almost a decade. Dilue Rose: Accounts of American Indians in Texas This activity contains a historical account of Dilue Rose, who was a 10-year-old girl at the outbreak of the Revolution. Excerpts document settlers’ views of American Indians. Exit Ticket This activity examines Sam Houston's initial response to his position on relations with the American Indians of Texas during his first inaugural address in 1836. The Captivity of Macario Leal: A Tejano among the Comanches Rivaya-Martínez, J. (2014). The Captivity of Macario Leal: A Tejano among the Comanches, 1847–1854. Southwestern Historical Quarterly 117(4), pp. 372-402. Native Land Digital Native Land Digital fosters conversations about the history of colonialism, indigenous ways of knowing, and settler-Indigenous relations, through educational resources. The President's Inaugural Address Newspaper article from the Telegraph and Texas Register that includes Sam Houston’s inaugural address for his position as President of the Republic of Texas. Borden, G.& T.H. “Telegraph and Texas Register (Columbia, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 37, Ed. 1, Wednesday, November 9, 1836. National Archives: Document Analysis Worksheets Document analysis is the first step in working with primary sources. Teach your students to think through primary source documents for contextual understanding and to extract information to make informed judgments. Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise An examination of Anglo-American relations with American Indians in Texas from the perspective of a 12-year-old girl leading up to the Texas Revolution. A Tejano Living among the Comanches This activity explores a historical account of a young Tejano boy, Macario Leal, who was capture by a Comanche raiding party and lived with the Comanche for almost a decade. Dilue Rose: Accounts of American Indians in Texas This activity contains a historical account of Dilue Rose, who was a 10-year-old girl at the outbreak of the Revolution. Excerpts document settlers’ views of American Indians. Exit Ticket This activity examines Sam Houston's initial response to his position on relations with the American Indians of Texas during his first inaugural address in 1836. The Captivity of Macario Leal: A Tejano among the Comanches Rivaya-Martínez, J. (2014). The Captivity of Macario Leal: A Tejano among the Comanches, 1847–1854. Southwestern Historical Quarterly 117(4), pp. 372-402. Native Land Digital Native Land Digital fosters conversations about the history of colonialism, indigenous ways of knowing, and settler-Indigenous relations, through educational resources. The President's Inaugural Address Newspaper article from the Telegraph and Texas Register that includes Sam Houston’s inaugural address for his position as President of the Republic of Texas. Borden, G.& T.H. “Telegraph and Texas Register (Columbia, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 37, Ed. 1, Wednesday, November 9, 1836. National Archives: Document Analysis Worksheets Document analysis is the first step in working with primary sources. Teach your students to think through primary source documents for contextual understanding and to extract information to make informed judgments.
Unit Plan # 5 60-90 min English | Accommodations untlbs people ethnic groups american indians 74A 74B 720A 720B 720C 722 723 76AELA 76CELA

Voices: Tejanos in the Texas Revolution

Students will examine the roles played by the people involved in the Texas Revolution, such as Juan N. Seguín and other prominent Tejanos.

Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this lesson. The Texas Revolution as Part of the Ongoing Civil War in Mexico This activity explores Tejano’s perspectives about the Texas Revolution. Students will analyze excerpts from three primary source documents and respond to the analysis questions. Juan Sequin a Historical Account of his Military Career This activity examines historical accounts of Juan N. Seguín’s military career during the Texas Revolution. Students will analyze excerpts from four primary source documents then respond to the analysis questions. Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this lesson. The Texas Revolution as Part of the Ongoing Civil War in Mexico This activity explores Tejano’s perspectives about the Texas Revolution. Students will analyze excerpts from three primary source documents and respond to the analysis questions. Juan Seguín a Historical Account of his Military Career This activity examines historical accounts of Juan N. Seguín’s military career during the Texas Revolution. Students will analyze excerpts from four primary source documents then respond to the analysis questions.
Unit Plan # 6 30-60 min English | Accommodations keywrd people tejanos 73A 73B 720A 720B 720C 722A

Voices: Women in the Texas Revolution

Students will examine the roles played by the people involved in the Texas Revolution, such as Susanna Dickinson, Dilue Rose Harris, and Angelina Peyton Eberly.

Lesson Plan Downloadable/editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise Students are provided with an engaging modern-day scenario and analysis questions that align with Susanna’s trek from the Alamo back to Gonzales to deliver the news to General Houston that the Alamo had fallen. Background Essay about Susanna Dickinson This is a brief biography and examination of Susanna’s involvement in the entirety of the Revolution. Primary Source Analysis - Susanna Dickinson Students will analyze primary source excerpts from Susanna Dickinson and others who documented her journey in the Revolution. Exit Ticket - Susanna Dickenson Students will use critical thinking skills to reflect on the process of primary source documentation. The Runaway Scrape and the Aftermath An examination of women's influence in the war effort and the physical and emotional toll the events and aftermath of the Runaway Scrape took on families and particularly women. Primary Source Analysis - The Reminiscences of Mrs. Dilue (Rose) Harris, Part 1 An examination of the conditions in Texas during the Runaway Scrape during the Texas Revolution from the perspective of an eleven-year-old girl who endured many hardships. Primary Source Analysis - The Reminiscences of Mrs. Dilue (Rose) Harris, Part 2 An examination of the conditions in Texas during and after the Battle of San Jacinto from the perspective of an eleven-year-old. Exit Ticket - Dilue Rose Harris Students will use critical thinking skills to create a Twitter post and hashtag by Dilue Rose summarizing her experience in the final battles and immediate aftermath of the Texas Revolution. Thomas Jefferson Rusk’s account of the Runaway Scrape Noah Smithwick, The Evolution of a State, or, Recollections of Old Texas Days The Reminiscences of Mrs. Dilue Harris Lesson Plan Versiones descargables / editables de esta página. Ejercicio de gancho A los estudiantes se les proporciona un escenario moderno atractivo y preguntas de análisis que se alinean con el viaje de Susanna desde el Álamo de regreso a Gonzales para darle la noticia al General Houston de que el Álamo había caído. Susanna Dickinson: Ensayo de antecedentes Esta es una breve biografía y examen de la participación de Susanna en la totalidad de la Revolución. Análisis de fuentes primarias - Susanna Dickinson Los estudiantes analizarán extractos de fuentes primarias de Susanna Dickinson y otros que documentaron su viaje en la Revolución. Boleto de salida: Susanna Dickenson Los estudiantes utilizarán habilidades de pensamiento crítico para reflexionar sobre el proceso de documentación de fuentes primarias. El Runaway Scrape y sus secuelas Un examen de la influencia de las mujeres en el esfuerzo de guerra y el costo físico y emocional que los eventos y las secuelas de Runaway Scrape tuvieron en las familias y particularmente en las mujeres. Los recuerdos de la Sra. Dilue (Rose) Harris, parte 1 Un examen de las condiciones en Texas durante el Runaway Scrape durante la Revolución de Texas desde la perspectiva de una niña de once años que soportó muchas dificultades. Los recuerdos de la Sra. Dilue (Rose) Harris, parte 2 Un examen de las condiciones en Texas durante y después de la Batalla de San Jacinto desde la perspectiva de una niña de once años. Boleto de salida - Dilue Rose Harris Los estudiantes usarán habilidades de pensamiento crítico para crear una publicación en Twitter y un hashtag de Dilue Rose que resuma su experiencia en las batallas finales e inmediatamente después de la Revolución de Texas. Lesson Plan Downloadable/editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise Students are provided with an engaging modern-day scenario and analysis questions that align with Susanna’s trek from the Alamo back to Gonzales to deliver the news to General Houston that the Alamo had fallen. Background Essay about Susanna Dickinson This is a brief biography and examination of Susanna’s involvement in the entirety of the Revolution. Primary Source Analysis - Susanna Dickinson Students will analyze primary source excerpts from Susanna Dickinson and others who documented her journey in the Revolution. Exit Ticket - Susanna Dickenson Students will use critical thinking skills to reflect on the process of primary source documentation. The Runaway Scrape and the Aftermath An examination of women's influence in the war effort and the physical and emotional toll the events and aftermath of the Runaway Scrape took on families and particularly women. Primary Source Analysis - Dilue Rose Harris An examination of the conditions in Texas during the final battles of the Texas Revolution from the perspective of an eleven-year-old girl who endured many hardships. Exit Ticket - Dilue Rose Harris Students will use critical thinking skills to create a Twitter post and hashtag by Dilue Rose summarizing her experience in the final battles and immediate aftermath of the Texas Revolution.
Unit Plan # 7 60-90 min English | Español | Accommodations keywrd people women 73A 73B 73C 716A 720B 720C 720D 76AELA 76BELA 76CELA

Battles of the Texas Revolution

The student will examine the Battle of the Alamo, Battle of Coleto Creek, Goliad Massacre, Runaway Scrape, and Battle of San Jacinto and understand the influence of the following people: Travis. Bowie, Sequin, Houston, Fannin, Urrea, and Santa Anna.

Lesson Plan Downloadable/editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise Analysis of the painting Dawn at the Alamo. The lead questions are embedded within the slideshow. The students will examine historical paintings to determine if historical bias exists based on the artist's interpretation of the event. Slideshow This ready to use classroom presentation covers the battles of the Texas Revolution including the Alamo, Battle at Coleto Creek, Goliad Massacre, and Battle of San Jacinto. Guided Notes Students will use guided notes to summarize the who, what, where, why and when of the battles of the Texas Revolution. The Runaway Scrape and Aftermath Analysis of primary source documents to understand the difficulties faced by Texans as they destroyed their homes and farms, fleeing as Santa Anna’s army swept towards them. Treaties of Velasco This printable primary source document will be used to analyze the public and private Treaties of Velasco. Exit Ticket This printable exit ticket uses a primary source account from José Antonio Navarro that offers a glimpse inside the San Antonio Tejanos opinion of the new Centralist government. Lesson Plan Downloadable/editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise Analysis of the painting Dawn at the Alamo. The lead questions are embedded within the slideshow. The students will examine historical paintings to determine if historical bias exists based on the artist's interpretation of the event. Slideshow This ready to use classroom presentation covers the battles of the Texas Revolution including the Alamo, Battle at Coleto Creek, Goliad Massacre, and Battle of San Jacinto. Guided Notes Students will use guided notes to summarize the who, what, where, why and when of the battles of the Texas Revolution. The Runaway Scrape and Aftermath Analysis of primary source documents to understand the difficulties faced by Texans as they destroyed their homes and farms, fleeing as Santa Anna’s army swept towards them. Treaties of Velasco This printable primary source document will be used to analyze the public and private Treaties of Velasco. Exit Ticket This printable exit ticket uses a primary source account from José Antonio Navarro that offers a glimpse inside the San Antonio Tejanos opinion of the new Centralist government. Additional Documents Chariton, Wallace O. 100 Days in Texas: the Alamo Letters. Wordware Pub., 1990. This is a collection of personal letters leading up to and at the conclusion of the Alamo. Wonderful resource. Todd Hansen, ed., The Alamo Reader: A Study in History (Stackpole Books, 2003). This is a massive collection of primary sources from the Texas Revolution, focused around accounts that deal with the Alamo. Wonderful resource. Gary Zaboly, An Altar for Their Sons: The Alamo and the Texas Revolution in Contemporary Newspaper Accounts (State House Press, 2011). A massive, and wonderfully organized, collection of newspaper accounts about the Alamo during the Texas Revolution and throughout the nineteenth century.
Unit Plan # 8 90 min English | Accommodations none 73A 73B 73C 716A 720B 720C 720D 76AELA 76CELA

Battles of the Texas Revolution - Extension Lesson

Students will examine more deeply the importance of San Antonio de Béxar and the Alamo, by examining primary source letters written by William B. Travis, Santa Anna, Jose Francisco Ruiz, and Mexican soldiers’ accounts of the Battle of the Alamo.

Lesson Plan Downloadable/editable versions of this lesson plan. The Importance of San Antonio de Béxar and the Alamo This extension lesson examines primary source letters written by William B. Travis, Santa Anna, Jose Francisco Ruiz, and two Mexican soldiers' accounts of the Battle of the Alamo.
Extension 45-60 min English none 73A 73B 73C 716A 720B 720C 720D 76AELA 76CELA

The Texas Revolution: Connections to the Republic of Texas

Students will create connections to the Republic era by evaluating the social, economic, and political impacts of independence.

Lesson Plan Downloadable/editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise Students will analyze the outcome of two documents written to different audiences by participating in a fun and relevant hook exercise. The scenario sets the scene for the “big” event of the year, the school dance. Students are instructed to write two quick notes, one to their parents and one to their friend, to inform them about the dance. Slideshow This slideshow presentation is an examination and comparison of the public and private treaties signed by Santa Anna, David Burnett, and other Texas officials to end the Revolution and recognize Texas as an independent Republic. Treaties of Velasco Students will analyze and compare the two Treaties of Velasco and form conclusions regarding the agreements to end the Revolution. Aftermath of the Texas Revolution: Cotton and Slavery Analyze the primary source documents and charts to answer the document analysis questions using supporting evidence. Exit Ticket This Exit Ticket explores Tejano perspectives of the Texas Revolution through the words of Juan Seguin. The Public Treaty of Velasco 1836 copy of the Treaty of Velasco; negotiated by Sam Houston to achieve peace between Texas and Mexico, courtesy of the Star of the Republic Museum. Population Database: Graphs and Statistics from the Texas Slavery Project Graphs and Statistics from the Texas Slavery Project featuring data in eight graphs. Copy of the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, March 17, 1836 Copy of the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, transcribed by Secretary of Convention, Henry S. Kimble: March 17, 1836, courtesy of the Benson Latin American Collection. Lesson Plan Downloadable/editable versions of this lesson plan. Hook Exercise Students will analyze the outcome of two documents written to different audiences by participating in a fun and relevant hook exercise. The scenario sets the scene for the “big” event of the year, the school dance. Students are instructed to write two quick notes, one to their parents and one to their friend, to inform them about the dance. Slideshow This slideshow presentation is an examination and comparison of the public and private treaties signed by Santa Anna, David Burnett, and other Texas officials to end the Revolution and recognize Texas as an independent Republic. Treaties of Velasco Students will analyze and compare the two Treaties of Velasco and form conclusions regarding the agreements to end the Revolution. Aftermath of the Texas Revolution: Cotton and Slavery Analyze the primary source documents and charts to answer the document analysis questions using supporting evidence. Exit Ticket This Exit Ticket explores Tejano perspectives of the Texas Revolution through the words of Juan Seguin. The Public Treaty of Velasco 1836 copy of the Treaty of Velasco; negotiated by Sam Houston to achieve peace between Texas and Mexico, courtesy of the Star of the Republic Museum. Population Database: Graphs and Statistics from the Texas Slavery Project Graphs and Statistics from the Texas Slavery Project featuring data in eight graphs. Copy of the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, March 17, 1836 Copy of the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, transcribed by Secretary of Convention, Henry S. Kimble: March 17, 1836, courtesy of the Benson Latin American Collection.
Unit Plan # 9 90 min English | Accommodations none 73A 73C 75A 716A 720B 720C 720D 76AELA 76CELA 815SS 817SS

The Texas Revolution: Connections to the Republic of Texas - Extension Lesson

This online extension activity provides a visual connection to cotton and slavery growth in Texas from 1790-1860. Students will manipulate and analyze interactive maps through guided questions.

Extension Lesson Plan Downloadable/Editable versions of this lesson plan. Digital Lab This Digital Lab visually explores the connection to cotton and slavery growth in Texas from 1790-1860 using animated maps and data. Students will answer questions after manipulating and analyzing interactive resources.
Extension 45-60 min English none 73A 73C 75A 716A 720B 720C 720D 76AELA 76CELA

Primary Sources

We've assembled the following list of primary sources that are applicable to the Texas Revolution. Primary Source Sets consist of images and documents from the Portal to Texas History which can be downloaded and shared with students.

Telegraph and Texas Register newspaper prints copy of William Barret Travis’s last surviving letter (written on March 3, 1836) from the Alamo, March 24, 1836

Telegraph and Texas Register (a newspaper in San Felipe, Texas) prints a copy of William Barret Travis’s last surviving letter from the Alamo, describing conditions within the Alamo, urging the convention at Washington-on-the-Brazos to declare independence for Texas, and appealing for reinforcements.

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Texas Declaration of Causes for Taking Up Arms Against Santa Anna November 7, 1835 (Newspaper Printings)

The Texas Declaration of Causes for Taking Up Arms Against Santa Anna November 7, 1835 appeared in various printings.

73A

Telegraph and Texas Register newspaper prints notice of reward for the runaway slave, Joe.

Telegraph and Texas Register (a newspaper in San Felipe, Texas) prints a notice of reward for the runaway slave, Joe, who was the only known male survivor of the battle of the Alamo.

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Maps

We've assembled the following list of maps that are applicable to the Texas Revolution.

North America

North America

A map of the North American continent. The map is color coordinated by countries and territories circa 1836.

New map of Texas: with the contiguous American & Mexican states (1836)

New map of Texas: with the contiguous American & Mexican states (1836)

"Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1835." Insets: Land grants, Remarks on Texas, Rivers of Texas.

Map of Texas with parts of the adjoining states. (1836)

Map of Texas with parts of the adjoining states. (1836)

Map shows early land grants and colonies in Texas and New Mexico encompassing [modern-day] Texas panhandle; areas of Native American habitation, land grant boundaries. Includes notes. Relief shown by hachures. Scale [ca.1:1,500,000].

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - San Antonio de Bexar - 1836

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - San Antonio de Bexar - 1836

Map of San Antonio de Bexar showing the streets, rivers and creeks, and plazas as they were in 1836.

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Combat near the Mission Concepción, October 28, 1835.

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Combat near the Mission Concepción, October 28, 1835.

Map of combat at the Battle of Concepción during the Texas Revolution, showing lines of assault by Mexican infantry, cannon, and dragoons, and lines held by Captain Fannin's and Captain Coleman's companies. The battlefield is surrounded by wooded terrain and lies next to the San Antonio River. No scale indicated.

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - The siege of Bexar

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - The siege of Bexar

Hand-drawn map depicting the Siege of Bexar. It shows the line of attack by the Texans against the Mexican forces occupying Bexar and supported by the Mexican garrison then in the Alamo, from December 5th to 10th, 1835. Map including roads, major buildings, rivers, and creeks. The distances to various locations are given. Some twentieth century streets of San Antonio are superimposed. No scale indicated.

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Refugio Mission

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Refugio Mission

"Ground plan of the original buildings, with walls enclosing the cemetery"

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Ground plan of Fort Defiance

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Ground plan of Fort Defiance

"Relief shown by hachures. "To accompany Texas independence by Col. A.J. Houston."

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Map of Texas, with Coahuila, in 1835-36

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Map of Texas, with Coahuila, in 1835-36

Map of the United States and Mexico, showing territories but not states. Cities and towns representing areas of recruitment are shown, as are Indian villages and forts in Texas. No scale indicated.

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Military map of Texas and Coahuila, as Mexican territory, 1835-36

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Military map of Texas and Coahuila, as Mexican territory, 1835-36

Military map of Texas and Coahuila, showing lines of Mexican and Texan frontier and lines of march to the San Jacinto battlefield during the Texas Revolution. The map also includes rivers, creeks, towns, routes, trails, mines, and Indian villages. No scale indicated.

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - The Alamo

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - The Alamo

Ground plan compiled from drawings by Capt. B. Green Jameson, Texan Army, January, 1826,Col. Ignacio de Labastida, Mexican Army, March, 1836, Capt. Ruben M. Potter, United States Army, 1841.

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Fannin's fight

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Fannin's fight

Map of Fannin's Fight, showing the Texas Infantry, breastworks, and lines of assault by Mexican Dragoons and Infantry. Lines of march used by Colonel Fannin and General Urrea are also shown. Note: " [shows] rise of six feet, behind which Mexican Artillery fired, on the 20th." There are also notes on the type of cannons used. Distances to various cities are given. No scale indicated.

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Map of the battlefield of San Jacinto

Military Maps of the Texas revolution - Map of the battlefield of San Jacinto

Map of the Battlefield of San Jacinto and map of the positions of the Texan and of the Mexican Armies, at the commencement of the Battle of San Jacinto, at half past three o'clock in the afternoon of Thursday, April 21, 1836. Shows the positions of the armies and features of the terrain between Buffalo Bayou and San Jacinto Bay.

Videos

We provide videos for both continuing education and classroom use. Please see each video's descriptive page for related resources and details about accessibility and viewing options.

Goliad: Virtual Field Trip
18 min. TEKS: 7.3(C)

Goliad: Virtual Field Trip

Explore an iconic setting of Texas history with an immersive journey through video, 3D virtual environments, photos, and documents of the Presidio La Bahia, also known as Fort Defiance, and Fannin Battleground State Historic Site in and around Goliad, TX.

none 73C
Who was Joe?
9 min. TEKS: 7.3(C)

Who was Joe?

Dr. Andrew Torget discusses Joe, the enslaved man owned by William Barret Travis during the Texas Revolution, and how Joe’s story reminds us that the revolution did not bring freedom for everyone.

untlbs people ethnic groups african americans 73C
Who was Juan Seguín?
8 min. TEKS: 7.2(E)

Who was Juan Seguín?

Dr. Andrew Torget explores the life of Juan Seguín, a Mexican-born citizen who supported Texas’ right to influence Mexican law, and fought for Texas Independence while commanding a unit at the Battle of San Jacinto.

keywrd people tejanos 72E
Who was Susanna Dickinson?
10 min. TEKS: 7.3(C)

Who was Susanna Dickinson?

Dr. Andrew Torget discusses Susanna Dickinson, who survived the Alamo siege and relayed a message to General Sam Houston, and the enormous sacrifices she paid during the Texas Revolution.

keywrd people women 73C
Road to Revolution
53 min. TEKS: 7.3

Road to Revolution

The factors leading to revolution in Texas, covering: (1) A Ridiculous Rebellion in East Texas, (2) Constitution of 1827, (2) Decree 56, Thwarting Mexican Law, (4) Law of April 6, 1830.

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Rebellion
59 min. TEKS: 7.3

Rebellion

The factors leading to revolution in Texas, covering: (1) Disturbances at Anahuac and Velasco,(2) Texans as Ardent Federalists, (3) The Quest for Separate Statehood, (4) Cotton Boom!, (5) Chaos of 1835, Revolution Begins.

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Revolution (Part 1)
62 min. TEKS: 7.3

Revolution (Part 1)

The Texas Revolution, covering: (1) Chaos of Late 1835, (2) Battle of San Antonio.

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Revolution (Part 2)
41 min. TEKS: 7.3

Revolution (Part 2)

The Texas Revolution (continued from part 1), covering: (3) Siege of the Alamo.

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Revolution (Part 3)
60 min. TEKS: 7.3

Revolution (Part 3)

The Texas Revolution (continued from part 2), covering: (3) Aftermath of the Siege of the Alamo, (4) Massacre at Goliad, (5) Runaway Scrape, (6) San Jacinto.

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More Resources

The following list of resources provide additional information to help you dive deeper into the context of the unit. Books are linked to OCLC WorldCat, allowing you find a copy in your nearest local library or to make a request for it using interlibrary loan.

  • General

  • website Results for The Texas Revolution, 1835-1836 in The Portal to Texas History

    Digital copies of primary sources including letters, documents, and other artifacts from Texas in 1835-1836 as well as transcripts and other publications and media about the Texas Revolution contributed to The Portal to Texas History by institutional partners from across the State.
  • website The Handbook of Texas

    A digital encyclopedia developed by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) that is free and offers in-depth, reliable, and authoritative entries on every aspect of Texas history.
  • book Todd Hansen, ed., The Alamo Reader: A Study in History (Stackpole Books, 2003)

    A massive collection of primary sources from the Texas Revolution, focused around accounts that deal with the Alamo.
  • book Stephen Hardin, Texian Iliad: A Military History of the Texas Revolution (University of Texas Press, 1994).

    The most thorough military account of the battles and fighting of the war.
  • book Paul Lack, The Texas Revolutionary Experience: A Political and Social History, 1835-1836 (Texas A&M Press, 1992)

    In-depth analysis of all aspects of life during the Texas Revolution.
  • book Gary Zaboly, An Altar for Their Sons: The Alamo and the Texas Revolution in Contemporary Newspaper Accounts (State House Press, 2011)

    A massive collection of newspaper accounts about the Alamo during the Texas Revolution and throughout the nineteenth century.
  • Tejanos In The Revolution

  • book Jesús F. de la Teja, ed., Tejano Leadership in Mexican and Revolutionary Texas (Texas A&M Press, 2010).

    A series of concise biographies of important and influential Tejanos.
    keywrd people tejanos
  • book Jesús F. de la Teja, ed., A Revolution Remembered: The Memoirs and Selected Correspondence of Juan N. Seguín (State House Press, 1991).

    A concise biography of Seguin and a translation of his memoirs.
    keywrd people tejanos
  • book David McDonald, José Antonio Navarro: In Search of the American Dream in Nineteenth-Century Texas (Texas State Historical Association Press, 2010).

    In-depth of biography of Navarro.
    keywrd people tejanos
  • book Timothy Matovina and Jesús F. de la Teja, eds., Recollections of a Tejano Life: Antonio Menchaca in Texas History (University of Texas Press, 2013).

    Biography of Menchaca and his role in the Texas Revolution, along with a translation of Menchaca’s memoirs.
    keywrd people tejanos
  • book Art Martinez de Vara, Tejano Patriot: The Revolutionary Life of José Francisco Ruiz, 1783-1840 (Texas State Historical Association Press, 2020).

    Biography of an important Tejano who was Navarro’s uncle and fellow signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence.
    keywrd people tejanos
  • book Andrés Tijerina, Tejanos and Texas Under the Mexican Flag, 1821-1836 (Texas A&M Press, 1994).

    Overall account of Tejanos in Texas during the 1821-1836 era.
    keywrd people tejanos
  • Women In The Revolution

  • book Mary L. Scheer, ed., Women and the Texas Revolution (University of North Texas Press, 2012).

    The fullest collection of works on the experiences of women during the Revolution.
    keywrd people women
  • book Todd Hansen, ed., The Alamo Reader: A Study in History (Stackpole Books, 2003)

    Numerous primary sources from the perspectives of women.
    keywrd people women
  • book Paul Lack, The Texas Revolutionary Experience: A Political and Social History, 1835-1836 (Texas A&M Press, 1992)

    Regularly engages the experiences of women in the Revolution.
    keywrd people women
  • African Americans In The Texas, 1821-1836

  • book Andrew J. Torget, Seeds of Empire: Cotton, Slavery, and the Transformation of the Texas Borderlands, 1800-1850 (UNC Press, 2015).

    Focuses on the role of cotton and slavery in the transformation of Texas from Spanish/Mexican hinterland into the westernmost outpost of the United States.
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  • book Ron Jackson and Lee Spencer White, Joe: The Slave Who Became An Alamo Legend (University of Oklahoma Press, 2015).

    The most thorough account of the life of Joe
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  • book Paul Lack, “Black Texans and Slavery in Revolution and War,” in The Texas Revolutionary Experience.

    Direct and succinct account of the experiences of Black Texans during the Revolution.
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  • book Andrew J. Torget, “Stephen F. Austin’s Views on Slavery in Early Texas,” in The Corner of Canaan (UNT Press, 2013).

    An account of Austin’s views on slavery and how they evolved over time.
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  • book Jeffrey Dunn, “’To the Devil with your Glorious History!’: Women and the Battle of San Jacinto,” in Women and the Texas Revolution.

    The most thorough account of Emily West’s experiences.
    untlbs people ethnic groups african americans